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Literature: Poetry

The reading of works by classical poets, such as Homer, Virgil, Sappho, Catullus, and Horace, opens up what it means to be human—to live and die, to win and lose, to love and hate, and to laugh and cry. 

Born into an aristocratic family on the Greek island of Lesbos, Sappho (620-550 BC) was a proficient Greek poet, known best for her lyric poetry, which was composed to be sung with the accompaniment of a lyre. Although. . .

by Joe Laufer '21

It is common in myths, especially those of the Greeks, for there to be dualities. Good and evil, god and mortal, and light and dark are just a few that may come to mind. The ways in which the authors of myths. . .

Our legendary poet Catullus (84–54 BC), who produced countless wonderful and lasting poems in the late Roman Republic, was in fact just like any other male during his time: his greatest weakness was women. . .

by Michaela Phan '19

In Book 1 of the Aeneid, Vergil first introduces Dido as a character with a preexisting and complex history as a widow, an exile from Tyre, and then a political leader in a thriving city. Her backstory rivals that of Aeneas. . .